Category: alipyper likes to crochet

free vintage crochet climbing trellis hexagon pot holder pattern

I have a potholder that my Grandma Mangum crocheted years ago and I’ve wanted to figure out the pattern for a long time. I finally recreated her pattern in no. 10 crochet cotton and a size 6 (1.80mm) steel crochet hook. It’s nice and thick and I love how it turned out! But it took longer than I thought a potholder should take to crochet.

So I used a thicker cotton crochet yarn – a size 3 or size 5 crochet cotton thread or a light dk cotton yarn keep the holes in the pattern pretty small and tight (important for a potholder!) – and a size C/2 (2.75mm) crochet hook to make the pattern a quick housewarming or bridal shower gift.

Vintage Climbing Trellis Hexagon Potholder

US Crochet Terms:

ch: chain

dc: double crochet

sc: single crochet

sl st: slip stitch

sp: space

Make a sliding loop or magic ring (go here or here for a good tutorial, or ch 4, sl st in first chain to close the ring). Ch 3 (counts as first dc here and throughout). Make 23 dc into ring. Tighten the ring and slip stitch into the top of the first ch 3 to close. (24 dc)

Row 1: Ch 3. 1 dc in the next 3 dc. Ch 2. (1 dc in the next 4 dc, ch 2) 5 times. Sl st in the top of first ch 3. Sl st in the next 3 dc and (attach new color yarn here if desired) then sl st into next ch-2 sp. (24 dc and 6 ch-2 sp)

Row 2: (Ch 3, 2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) all in the same beginning ch-2 sp. Ch 1. (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc in next ch-2 sp. Ch 1.) 5 times. Sl st in top of first ch 3. Sl st in next 2 dc and (attach new color yarn here if desired) then sl st into next ch-2 sp.

Row 3: (Ch 3, 2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) all in the same beginning ch-2 sp. 4 dc in next ch-1 sp. (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc into next ch-2 sp. 4 dc in next ch-1 sp.) 5 times. Sl st in top of first ch 3. Sl st in next 2 dc and (attach new color yarn here if desired) then sl st into next ch-2 sp.

Row 4: (Ch 3, 2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) all in the same beginning ch-2 sp. Skip next 3 dc. 1 dc in sp between skipped 3 dc and next 4 dc. 1 dc in next 4 dc. 1 dc in sp between previous 4 dc and next 3 dc. (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc in next ch-2 sp. Skip next 3 dc. 1 dc in sp between skipped 3 dc and next 4 dc. 1 dc in next 4 dc. 1 dc in sp between previous 4 dc and next 3 dc.) 5 times. Sl st in top of first ch 3. Sl st in next 2 dc and (attach new color yarn here if desired) then sl st into next ch-2 sp.

Row 5: (Ch 3, 2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) all in the same beginning ch-2 sp. Skip next 3 dc. 1 dc in sp between skipped 3 dc and the next 6 dc. 1 dc in next 6 dc. 1 dc in sp between previous 6 dc and next 3 dc. (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc in next ch-2 sp. Skip next 3 dc. 1 dc in sp between skipped 3 dc and next 6 dc. 1 dc in next 6 dc. 1 dc in sp between previous 6 dc and next 3 dc.) 5 times. Sl st in top of first ch 3. Sl st in next 2 dc and (attach new color yarn here if desired) then sl st into next ch-2 sp.

Row 6: (Ch 3, 2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) all in the same beginning ch-2 sp. Skip next 3 dc. 1 dc in sp between skipped 3 dc and the next 8 dc. 1 dc in next 8 dc. 1 dc in sp between previous 8 dc and next 3 dc. (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc in next ch-2 sp. Skip next 3 dc. 1 dc in sp between skipped 3 dc and next 8 dc. 1 dc in next 8 dc. 1 dc in sp between previous 8 dc and next 3 dc.) 5 times. Sl st in top of first ch 3. Sl st in next 2 dc and (attach new color yarn here if desired) then sl st into next ch-2 sp.

Continue to increase each row in like manner until hexagon reaches desired size (6″ across is a good potholder size). Make a second hexagon.

With wrong sides together and right sides facing out, sc the 2 hexagons together, finishing the edge with a shell or picot trim if desired and adding a loop at one corner.

Click here to visit my Ravelry project page.

shawl crush

I’m seriously in love with Fanalaine’s shawl. I’m considering dropping every other single project I have in the works and devoting myself to it. It is utterly delightful. Maybe I’ll make it with this yarn, or this one? Or maybe I’ll pull out some vintage crochet cotton and have at it. Hmmm, I’m so distracted!

*fanalaine’s photos used with permission

sugar withdrawals and a danish heart tutorial that hasn’t happened yet

I bought this solid chocolate hand painted polka dot heart from Rococo Chocolates in London for the Mr. but I kind of don’t want him to eat it – it’s too cute!

London was so glorious and I had a lovely time! I’m in serious sugar withdrawals, though, now that I’m back home. AND Valentine’s Day is today. The torture!!  I’ve been trying to get a step by step picture tutorial of how to make a crocheted Danish Heart posted since a few people have found row 3 of the pattern a little bit tricky.

It will have to wait – we’re taking the kids to warmer climes this weekend and jetlag and the reality of three children and a household to run after being away for two weeks have conspired against me. When I get back…

loop knit lounge

Oh, oh, oh, I was in the most glorious yarn shop today. Loop Knit Lounge, located in London’s borough of Islington, was a complete delight, from top to bottom. Charming and helpful staff (co-owner Susan Cropper was behind the counter), the most glorious selection of yarn imaginable, books, magazines and lovely gifts – I could have stayed in the shop for hours, slowly moving from one spot of inspiration to the next. It was absolutely worth every single tube station change I made to get there and get back.

embroidered birthday badge

I’m working with the Young Women in our neighborhood now. We wanted to recognize the girls on the Sunday before their birthdays. I couldn’t really find something that I liked online, so I came up with this.

The badge measures 7″ x 9″ and hangs around the neck like a lanyard (didn’t want a pin or crown or cape to interfere with Sunday best outfits). It’s made from muslin, fabric and felt with a grosgrain ribbon. I actually made two, and might need to make more, just in case we have more than one birthday in a week.

Crocheted flower and leaf pattern here.

free danish heart crochet pattern

The Scandinavian blood in me responds quite strongly to the colors and pattern of the Danish Heart. The simplicity and ingenuity of the pattern is stunning. Two ovals of contrasting colors, folded in half with strategic slits, when woven together produce a charming checkerboard heart that becomes a little basket. Brilliant! Thank you Hans Christian Andersen!

Recently, I saw in a magazine the pattern for a knit version of the Danish Heart and my own heart did several palpitations.  A Danish Heart in YARN?? So absolutely fabulous!! However, the pattern required sewing knit pieces together BEFORE you even got to the weaving of the heart. Sorry, but excessive piecing and joining makes me eventually hate the project that I set out so excitedly to make.

before…….and after blocking

Knowing that I could crochet a flat oval quite easily, I figured out how to incorporate the necessary slits into the pattern so that when the oval is completed WITH ONE PIECE OF YARN the piece is ready to weave. Yay! So easy!

Danish Heart Crochet Pattern

Suggested Yarn and Crochet Hook Size
Fingering Weight + size C/2 – 2.75mm hook
DK Weight + size F/5 – 3.75mm hook
Worsted Weight + size H/6 – 5.00mm hook

Gauge is not important for this project – just make sure that your crochet is nice and tight. Adjust crochet hook size smaller if necessary.

US Crochet Terms
beg: beginning
ch(s): chain(s)
sc: single crochet
st: stitch
sl st: slip stitch

Make 2 Ovals – one in red, one in cream
Ch 30.
Round 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook. Sc in the next 27 ch. 3 sc in the last ch. Crocheting along the opposite side of the foundation ch, sc in the next 28 ch. 3 sc in the skipped ch from the beg. Sl st in beg sc.

Round 2: Ch 1. Sc in same st. Sc in the next 27 sc. 2 sc in the next 3 sc. Sc in the next 28 sc. 2 sc in the last 3 sc. Sl st in beg sc.

Round 3: Ch 1. Sc in same st. Ch 26. Taking care to not twist your chain, skip 26 sc and sc in next sc. (2 sc in next sc. Sc in next sc.) 3 times. Sc in next sc. Ch 26. Taking care to not twist your chain, skip 26 sc and sc in next sc. (2 sc in next sc. Sc in next sc.) 3 times. Sl st in beg sc.

Round 4: Ch 1. Sc in same st. Sc in the next 26 ch. Sc in the next sc. (Sc in the next 2 sc. 2 sc in the next sc.) 3 times. Sc in the next st. Sc in the next 26 ch. Sc in the next sc. (Sc in the next 2 sc. 2 sc in the next sc.) 3 times. Sl st in beg sc.

Round 5: Ch 1. Sc in same st. Sc in the next 27 sc. (2 sc in next sc. Sc in the next 3 sc.) 3 times. Sc in the next 28 sc. (2 sc in next sc. Sc in the next 3 sc.) 3 times. Sl st in beg sc.

Round 6: Ch 1. Sc in same st. Sc in the next 27 sc. (Sc in the next 2 sc. 2 sc in the next sc. Sc in the next 2 sc.) 3 times. Sc in the next 28 sc. (Sc in the next 2 sc. 2 sc in the next sc. Sc in the next 2 sc.) 3 times. Sl st in beg sc.

Round 7: Ch 1. Sc in the same st. Sc in the next 27 sc. (Sc in the next 5 sc. 2 sc in the next sc.) 3 times. Sc in the next 28 sc. (Sc in the next 5 sc. 2 sc in the next sc.) 3 times. Sl st in beg sc.

Leaving an 18” tail, break yarn and knot.

Make 1 Strap in Red
Leaving an 18″ tail, ch 31.
Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook. Sc in each ch to end. (30 st)
Row 2 – 4: Ch 1, turn. Sc in each sc across to end. (30 st)
Leaving an 18″ tail, cut yarn and knot.

Assembly
Making sure that the ending tails of yarn on the red and cream ovals are turned towards the outside, fold in half with right sides facing. Position ovals and weave them together using the following illustration as a guide. Use the tails of yarn to sew the heart together in the places indicated. Using the long tails on the strap, sew the strap on the inside of the heart to form a handle in the places indicated. Weave in ends.

Crochet up a bunch to decorate a Christmas tree or to give away as Valentine’s gifts. Or make a few for special people that need to know you love them. Enjoy!

Easy to print pattern here.

the incredible power of handwork

I was deeply touched by this short clip of Renate Hiller, co-director of the Fiber Craft Studio at the Threefold Educational Center in Chestnut Ridge, New York, who speaks on the transcendent and meditative qualities of creating with our hands and the importance of using natural and beautiful fibers in our work.

To quote from the video clip:

“…in handwork, in transforming nature we also make something truly unique that we have made with our hands, stitch by stitch, that maybe we have chosen the yarn, we have even spun the yarn — even better, and that we have designed. And when I do that, I feel whole. I feel I am experiencing my inner core because it’s a meditative process. You have to find your way; you have to listen with your whole being. And that is the schooling that we all need today. Because we’re so egocentric and this makes us think of what is needed by something else. So we are in a way practicing empathy — empathy with the material, empathy with the design. I think this practicing of empathy that we do in the fiber crafts is paramount for being healing to our world. And it’s a service for the divine that we are surrounded by.”

Thank you Amanda!

spiderstitch baby blanket up for auction!

Our friends, the Truax Family, are making the final push to raise enough money to adopt three orphan siblings from the Ukraine. They’ve set up an online auction and have listed some really fantastic items people can bid on Thursday and Friday, November 15-16th! See all the details here.

Last month I crocheted a baby blanket that will be part of the auction! This blanket was hand crocheted with high quality 100% mercerized cotton yarn from England and can be lovingly passed down from generation to generation. It’s a great baby size, 27.5″ x 34″, and will work for summer or winter.

If you want to bid on the blanket, set your clocks for 1 am Thursday November 15th to get your bid in! Check out the bid page here.

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